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October 5, 2006

Luck Stone Donates 1,063 Tons of Stone to State Forests

The Luck Stone Company,Truck being loaded with stone. which is headquartered in Goochland County, has donated 563 tons of #57 stone to the Virginia Department of Forestry for use on the Cumberland State Forest. An additional gift of 500 tons on November 1st will be given to VDOF for use on eight other State Forests.

"This is a tremendous gift," said State Forester Carl Garrison. "The folks at Luck Stone have been actively involved in environmental stewardship for a number of years. Their generous donation to Virginia's State Forests will go a long way toward ensuring these precious lands will remain healthy for generations of Virginians."

Luck Stone's Denise Baddour was instrumental in making this partnership a reality. "The gift of stone to Virginia's State Forests is a reflection of Luck Stone's core values. As a family owned company, we believe that environmental stewardship is one of the greatest gifts we can give to keep the Commonwealth a great place for all of us."

Luck Stone's Powhatan Plant Manager Bob Blair; Plant Foreman Mark Williams;
  Environmental Health and Safety Manager Bobby Bolling; Director of Sales Development
  Hardy Josephson; Business Process Coordinator Dennis Travis, and Controller
  Mark Endries joined Mr. Garrison and State Forest Manager Gary Heiser on October
  3rd at Luck's Powhatan Plant to oversee the first load of donated stone being
  loaded into VDOF's dump truck, which was driven by Avond Randolph.

Luck Stone's Powhatan Plant Manager Bob Blair; Plant Foreman Mark Williams; Environmental Health and Safety Manager Bobby Bolling; Director of Sales Development Hardy Josephson; Business Process Coordinator Dennis Travis, and Controller Mark Endries joined Mr. Garrison and State Forest Manager Gary Heiser on October 3rd at Luck's Powhatan Plant to oversee the first load of donated stone being loaded into VDOF's dump truck, which was driven by Avond Randolph.







Bedford Fire Academy Trains Wildland Firefighters

An interagency wildfire training academy was conducted September 20-24 in Bedford County. A total of 197 students were on hand for the week-long program that offered nine distinct fire courses, including basic fire suppression, chain saw operation, and fire line leadership training.

"This was the largest group to ever attend the Bedford Academy," said Larry Cochran, VDOF's fire training coordinator. "Participants came from all areas of Virginia to learn how to effectively combat wildland fire. They left the Academy better prepared for the challenges they will face in the field."

The Bedford Academy was an interagency effort that brought together resources from Bedford County Fire and Rescue; the National Park Service; the Virginia Department of Forestry, and the U. S. Forest Service.

Logger Cost-Share Program A Success

Bridges purchased using Logger Cost-Share Program funds. (Photos by Don Giegerich.)

Virginia's innovative cost-share program for loggers has been well received and is making a difference, according to the person responsible for creating the program.

Matt Poirot, VDOF’s water quality program manager, developed the idea for this first-of-its-kind-program to help loggers adhere to voluntary Best Management Practices used while harvesting timber. “Nearly 50 loggers have already benefited from the program. Virtually all of them have used the cost-share funds to purchase portable bridges. The bridges enable them to cross streams without having logging debris enter the waterway.”

The program provides up to 50 percent of the actual cost (not to exceed $2,000) of an approved stream crossing in watershed areas designated as “impaired” or those “of special interest” as defined by the Dept. of Environmental Quality. If the stream crossing includes the purchaseBridges purchased using Logger Cost-Share Program funds. (Photos by Don Giegerich.) of a portable bridge, the 50 percent funding level increases to a maximum of $4,000. Funding for the program comes from the Water Quality Improvement Fund, which is administered by the Dept. of Conservation and Recreation.

Bridges purchased using Logger Cost-Share Program funds. (Photos by Don Giegerich.)






Second Resource Management Academy Earns High Marks From VDOF Employees & Extension Foresters

A photo from the Academy. A photo from the Academy. A photo from the Academy.












Virginia Tech Extension foresters and private-industry consultant foresters joined VDOF employees at the Smith Mountain Lake 4-H Center for the second annual Resource Management Academy. Held Sept. 25 – 29, this year’s Academy offered the 175 “students” more than 40 courses in topic areas ranging from Conservation Education and Water Quality to Recreational Trail Development and Cost-Share programs available to landowners. A number of software courses designed to enhance computer skills were offered as well.

“We improved the Academy significantly,” said Anne Skalski, VDOF training coordinator. “By reducing the number of courses offered, we actually had more focused learning opportunities than we did last year.”

Dean Cumbia, director of resource management, said, “The Academy is designed to bring together a diverse group of employees -- from researchers, accountants and office staff to foresters and forestry technicians – and provide learning opportunities that will bridge the knowledge gaps that exist across these varied work responsibilities.”